Recent Question/Assignment

Modules 2 and 3 explore critical ways of thinking about how formal education and therefore the experiences of learners are shaped by forces within and beyond formal education (e.g. culture, politics). This task aims for you to demonstrate your understanding of some of the ideas explored in these topics.
To complete this task successfully, read the required readings (listed in the Program Calendar at the back of the Unit Outline) with this task in mind.

Task description
• Word count: 2500-2800 words. This includes all text (headings, in-text citations, captions and direct quotes). It excludes the Reference List. No 10% +/-.
• Reference using APA 7th edition. You must include page numbers in all of your in-text references.
• Not using 8 unit readings (from Modules 2 & 3) in this assessment may result in a fail for the assessment.

This task has TWO options. Choose ONE option only:

OPTION 1 (has two compulsory parts)

PART 1: Summarise and reflect on Modules 2 and 3 of the unit. Your summary should demonstrate a depth of understanding of how forces within and outside of education impact on things like the lives of learners, their experiences of learning and how education systems, schools, learning centres and/or educators should respond to ensure respect, inclusion and engagement.

You must use any 8 (eight) unit readings from Modules 2 and 3 from the Program Calendar (listed at the back of the Unit Outline), to write your summary, using in-text referencing.

PART 2: Next, use some of the ideas and concepts described in your summary to write an autobiographical narrative, story or anecdote of your schooling experience. This may be one of your experiences as a learner at preschool and/or primary school and/or secondary school, or what you observed as a learner which affected you. Your narrative or anecdote should highlight the influence of wider social/cultural/political forces on your schooling experiences. You can represent your experiences visually and through written word.
OPTION 2 (has two compulsory components)

PART 1: Summarise and reflect on Modules 2 and 3 of the unit. Your summaries should demonstrate a depth of understanding of how forces within and outside of education impact on things like the lives of learners, their experiences of learning and how education systems, schools, learning centres and/or educators should respond to ensure respect, inclusion and engagement.

You must use 8 (eight) unit readings from Modules 2 & 3 (listed in the Program Calendar at the back of the Unit Outline), to write your summary, using in-text referencing.

PART 2: Next, use some of the ideas and concepts described in your summary to write a biographical narrative / story / anecdote of the schooling experience, or one experience of a learner at preschool and/or primary school and/or secondary school. To do this you will need to interview somebody about their experiences of schooling. Your narrative / story / anecdote should highlight the influence of wider social/cultural/political forces on their schooling experiences. You can represent your experiences visually and through written word.

Sample narratives
• http://www.teenink.com/nonfiction/memoir/article/593645/A-Memoir-of-a-High-School-Student/
• https://www.wattpad.com/28685301-memoirs-from-my-first-day-at-high-school
• http://www.essentialkids.com.au/education/school/primary-school/different-approach-to-learning-yields-compassionate-results-20131218-2zkmz#ixzz4aDyMhLus
NOTE:
Seek help using Studiosity or Smart thinking (see side bar menu) before submitting your work.
There will be an online Collaborate workshop on this assessment
• Assessment 2: Case Study

• Additional information
Writing your summary
You may choose to write an overall summary of the modules (preferred), or a topic-by-topic summary.
• Identify the main ideas of the reading/s
• Consider the merits of the ideas presented
• Make connections between ideas and readings
• Explain why the ideas explored are useful for educators
Option 2
If I choose Option 2, you may choose another student at university, a parent or grandparent, a friend - it is up to you.
You want to get your interviewee reflecting deeply on their experiences - you may want to tell them the questions a day beforehand so they can think about it, think about examples and stories they can share. You may record the interview if the person is happy for you to do so - it is important to listen to what they say and give them prompts to get more information, stories, anecdotes from them.
Some details
• Each person's submission will be different, so there is no set word limit for each component, (1) and (2). You could aim for similar word counts per component (e.g. 1400 words each). The fewer the words in one component, the more words you will need to use in the other component. Remember, your goal is to demonstrate your thoughtful understanding of some of the ideas explored in the unit.
• (1) must be written in 3rd person point of view using in-text referencing, and (2) can be written in 1st person point of view.
• Use correct APA 7th Edition referencing for in-text and end of text referencing. See the Guide. Use page numbers for all in-text references (paraphrasing, ideas, and quotes)
• Do not plagiarise - acknowledge other people's ideas and words using correct referencing. When you submit online, Turn It In software will compare your work with other texts to ensure there is no plagiarism.
• You must use the required number of unit readings or you will be penalised. Once you have used the 8 required readings, you can then use additional articles/chapters/reports from credible sources (e.g. not blogs from the internet, etc.).
Formating advice
• 11 or 12 size font (Arial or New Times Roman)
• Normal margins
• 1.0 line spacing is fine
• Miss a line in between paragraphs
• The Reference List is always in alphabetical order, with hanging indents and on a separate page
• No cover page is needed
• Have a title
• Don't guess with APA in text or end text referencing
Details for assessment 2
Assessment 2: Case Study Topics 5-9 of Modules 2 and 3 explore critical ways of thinking about how formal education and therefore the experiences of learners are shaped by forces within and beyond formal education (e.g. culture, politics). This task aims for you to demonstrate your understanding of some of the ideas explored in these topics. To complete this task successfully, we recommend that you read the readings (listed in the Program Calendar at the back of the Unit Outline) with this task in mind.
Task description l Word count: 2500-2800 words. This includes all text (headings, in-text citations, captions and direct quotes). It excludes the Reference List. No 10% +/-. l Reference using APA 7th edition. You must include page numbers in all of your in-text references. l Not using 6 unit readings (from topics 5-9) in this assessment may result in a fail for the assessment.
This task has TWO options. Choose ONE option only: OPTION 1 (has two compulsory parts)
PART 1: Summarise and reflect on the topics from Modules 2 and 3, using at least 6 (six) readings from Modules 2 and 3. Your summary should demonstrate a depth of understanding of how forces within and outside of education impact on things like the lives of learners, their experiences of learning and how education systems, schools, learning centres and/or educators should respond to ensure respect, inclusion and engagement. You must use any 6 (six) unit readings from Topics 5-9 (Modules 2 and 3) from the Program Calendar (listed at the back of the Unit Outline), to write your summary, using in-text referencing.
PART 2: Next, use some of the ideas and concepts described in your summary to write an autobiographical narrative, story or anecdote of your schooling experience. This may be one of your experiences as a learner at preschool and/or primary school and/or secondary school, or what you observed as a learner which affected you. Your narrative or anecdote should highlight the influence of wider social/cultural/political forces on your schooling experiences. You can represent your experiences visually and through written word. OPTION 2 (has two compulsory components) PART 1: Summarise and reflect on the topics from Modules 2 and 3, using at least 6 (six) readings from Modules 2 and 3. Your summaries should demonstrate a depth of understanding of how forces within and outside of education impact on things like the lives of learners, their experiences of learning and how education systems, schools, learning centres and/or educators should respond to ensure respect, inclusion and engagement.
PART 2: Next, use some of the ideas and concepts described in your summary to write an autobiographical narrative / story / anecdote of the schooling experience, or one experience of a learner at preschool and/or primary school and/or secondary school. To do this you will need to interview somebody about their experiences of schooling. Your narrative / story / anecdote should highlight the influence of wider social/cultural/political forces on their schooling experiences. You can represent your experiences visually and through written word.
Modul 2
Topic 5 Learning about our diversity
Book: Powers of curriculum: sociological perspectives on education
Author:
Gobby, Brad.
Editor:
Gobby, Brad,
Additional Person Name:
Walker, Rebecca,
Journal Title:
Powers of curriculum :
Required readings Gowlett, C. & Niesche, R. (2017). Learner diversity and school practices. In B. Gobby & R. Walker. (eds). Powers of Curriculum: Sociological perspectives on education. (pp. 353- 372). Oxford University Press. (Chapter 14: SET TEXT)
Hayes, D. (2013). Young people and schools. In R. Connell, A. Welch, M. Vickers, et al. (eds). Education, Change and Society. Oxford University Press
Education, Change and Society
Raewyn Connell, Anthony Welch, Margaret Vickers, Dennis Foley, Nigel Bagnell, Debra Hayes, Helen Proctor, Arathi Sriprakash, and Craig Campbell
Topic 6 Disadvantage and the virtual schoolbag Dominant culture and cultural capital
Book Powers of curriculum: sociological perspectives on education
Author:
Gobby, Brad.
Editor:
Gobby, Brad,
Additional Person Name:
Walker, Rebecca,
Journal Title:
Powers of curriculum:
Required readings
McGregor, G. & Mills, M. (2017). The virtual schoolbag and pedagogies of engagement. In B. Gobby & R. Walker. (eds). Powers of curriculum: Sociological perspectives on education. (pp. 372-392). Oxford University Press. (Chapter 15: SET TEXT)
Windle, J. (2017). The education system and SES: Mapping disadvantage. In B. Gobby & R. Walker. (eds). Powers of curriculum: Sociological perspectives on education. (pp. 169-192). Oxford University Press. (Chapter 7: SET TEXT)
Topic 7 gender and education
Innocent children, dangerous families, and homophobic panic.
Author:
Taylor, Affrica.
Required readings
Pearce, J. (2017). The trap of binary thinking: Problematising gender and social disadvantage. In B. Gobby & R. Walker. (eds). Powers of Curriculum: Sociological perspectives on education. (pp. 194-214). Oxford University Press. (Chapter 8: SET TEXT)
Taylor, A. (2007). Innocent children, dangerous families and homophobic panic. In S. Poynting (Ed.), Outrageous!: moral panics in Australia (pp. 210-222). ACYS Publishing.
T A.pdf T A.pdf - Alternative Formats
McGraw, K. (2017). Identity formation: Consumerism and popular culture. In B. Gobby & R. Walker (eds). Powers of Curriculum: Sociological perspectives on education. (pp. 242-264). Oxford University Press. (Chapter 10: SET TEXT)
Topic 8 Australia’s history and culture and Indigenous educational justice. /Cultural diversity in the classroom
In this unit, culture refers to -the languages, customs, beliefs, rules, arts, knowledge, and collective identities and memories developed by members of all social groups that make their social environments meaningful- (Culture, http://www.asanet.org/topics/culture).
Required readings
Rudolph, S. & Brown, L. (2017). Understanding the techniques of colonialism: Indigenous educational justice. In B. Gobby & R. Walker (eds). Powers of curriculum: Sociological perspectives on education. (pp. 288-320). Oxford University Press.
Bird, M., Cooper, A., Turney, C., Curnoe, D., Russell, L. & Ulm, S. (2019). Australia’s epic story: a tale of amazing people, amazing creatures and rising seas. The Conversation. Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/australias-epic-story-a-tale-of-amazing-people-amazing-creatures-and-rising-seas-115701
Ballantyne, G. & Malhi, A. (2017). Interculturalism: how diverse societies can do better that passive tolerance. The Conversation. https://theconversation.com/interculturalism-how-diverse-societies-can-do-better-than-passive-tolerance-72874
Adam, H.J. (2019). Five tips to make school bookshelves more diverse and five books to get you started. The Conversation. Retrieved from https://theconversation.com/five-tips-to-make-school-bookshelves-more-diverse-and-five-books-to-get-you-started-110718
Modul 3
Topic 9 Curriculum and its planning lesson (click this link to enter)
Required Readings
Fleet, A. (2017). Planning, programming and embedding curriculum. in B. Gobby & R. Walker (eds). Powers of curriculum: Sociological perspectives on education. (pp. 421-444). Oxford University Press. (Chapter 17: SET TEXT)
Walker, R. (2017). Student-centred approaches to planning in primary and secondary schools. In Gobby & R. Walker (eds). Powers of curriculum: Sociological perspectives on education. (pp. 445-470). Oxford University Press. (Chapter 18: SET TEXT)
Curricula documents (extended/suggested readings)
ACARA. (2014). Australian Curriculum. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/
DEEWR. (2009). Belonging, being, becoming: Early Years Learning Framework: Our Philosophy. Canberra: Australian Government.
DEEWR. (2011). My time, our place: Framework for school age care in Australia. Canberra: Australian Government. Retrieved from: http://www.ecrh.edu.au/approved-learning-frameworks/my-time-our-place
Education Council (2019). Alice Springs (Mparntwe) Education Declaration. Retrieved from: https://docs.education.gov.au/documents/alice-springs-mparntwe-education-declaration

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