Recent Question/Assignment

1
Core Curriculum
Winter Term 2019
UNCC100:
Self and Community:
Exploring the Anatomy of Modern Society
UNIT OUTLINE
Credit points: 10
Prerequisites: Nil
Who to contact:
1. Questions about the unit: your Tutor
2. Tutorial selection or clash: CoreCurriculum.Student@acu.edu.au
3. Educational Inclusion Plan: Faculty Academic Liaison (See your local contact below)
4. Request for Extension: Faculty Academic Liaison (See your local contact below)
5. Request for Special Consideration: Faculty Academic Liaison (See your local contact below)
6. Other enquiry: CoreCurriculum.Student@acu.edu.au
Faculty Academic Liaison (Education & Arts):
Mr Roger Hillman (FEA.CoreCurriculum@acu.edu.au )
Faculty Academic Liaison (Health Sciences):
Ms Laurine Hurley (FHS.CoreCurriculum@acu.edu.au )
Faculty Academic Liaison (Law & Business):
Dr. Sr. Thuy-Linh Nguyen (FLB.CoreCurriculum@acu.edu.au )
Faculty Academic Liaison (Theology & Philosophy):
Dr. Richard Colledge (FTP.CoreCurriculum@acu.edu.au )
2
DESCRIPTION
Is polluting our environment done for the common good?
Does perpetuating discrimination respect the dignity of the individual?
These are just two examples of the many real challenges we face as individuals functioning as members of our community. They highlight the fact that as humans, we are all individuals, and yet none of us lives in isolation. The African concept of ‘ubuntu’ is helpful here: I am what I am, because of who we are - this concept is consistent with the principles of Catholic social thought. Understanding these principles helps us to determine how issues relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the common good may be addressed in our personal and professional lives now and in the future.
This knowledge and understanding is a foundation for the development of the skills needed to be able to propose ways to address challenges where shared responsibility for the common good is not being realized. Given the pervasiveness of such problems in our community, addressing this need is important to our success as a community in realizing a more just world – and your role as an individual who can, and must, be part of that.
Therefore, this unit will aim to equip you with knowledge and understanding of the ideas of -self- and -community- as interrelated concepts and develop basic skills to enable you to contribute to a more just society.
Mode/attendance pattern: This unit is offered in intensive mode in Winter Term. You are
required to complete activities in LEO prior to face-to-face classes. The activities are designed to support your completion of the assessment tasks. It is vital to the successful completion of the unit that you engage in these learning modes.
Duration: Intensive mode. You should anticipate undertaking 90 hours of study for this unit, including class attendance, readings and assignment preparation. This unit is the first of two units which are part of the University Core Curriculum.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this unit, you should be able to:
1. Describe coherently in writing the principles of Catholic Social Thought (CST), and through a personal written commentary on each one, explain how the concepts of 'self' and 'community' are interrelated.
2. Analyze and evaluate the principles of CST in order to write an argument that shows how issues relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the common good may be addressed by you in your professional practice (i.e. the degree program you are studying) now and in the future.
GRADUATE ATTRIBUTES
Each unit in your course contributes in some way to the development of the ACU Graduate
Attributes which you should demonstrate by the time you complete your course. You can view the ACU Graduate Attributes for all courses at http://www.acu.edu.au/204356. All Australian universities have their expected Graduate Attributes – ACU’s Graduate Attributes have a greater emphasis on ethical behavior and community responsibility than those of many other universities. All of your units will enable you to develop some attributes.
On successful completion of this unit, you should have developed your ability to:
GA1 demonstrate respect for the dignity of each individual and for human diversity GA2 recognize your responsibility to the common good, the environment and society
GA4 think critically and reflectively
GA7 work both autonomously and collaboratively
GA8 locate, organize, analyze, synthesize and evaluate information
GA9 demonstrate effective communication in oral and written English language and visual media
CONTENT
Topics will include:
• The Good Life and the Golden Rule
• I am because we are; the individual and society
• The history and principles of Catholic socialthought (parts 1 and 2)
• Human flourishing and the common good
• The common good
• Case study: challenges to the common good – freedoms and the common good
• Advocacy: personal and professional challenges of Catholic social thought
QUALITY ASSURANCE AND STUDENT FEEDBACK
This unit has been evaluated through the ‘Student Evaluation of Learning and Teaching’ (SELT) online surveys.
The following changes have been made:
-we introduced an extra class on the principles of Catholic Social Thought
-we introduced a new case study
-we revised and updated the marking rubrics
-we have included e-readings (recommended) on LEO
SELT surveys are usually conducted at the end of the teaching period. Your practical and constructive feedback is valuable to improve the quality of the unit. Please ensure you complete the SELT survey for the unit. You can also provide feedback at other times to the unit lecturers, course
coordinators and/or through student representatives.
TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES
This unit is delivered in:
• face-to-face mode over a 10-week period in a normal university semester; • an intensive mode in Winter and Summer Terms; and,
• an online mode.
Face-to-face and intensive modes adopt a ‘flipped class room’ approach with no lectures. Small group classes of one hour’s duration are adopted with ‘active learning’ techniques being used as opposed to a didactic method. Active learning methods may include but are not limited to the use of facilitated group discussions; ice-breakers; buzz groups; role play and advocacy.
All resources are electronically based and available through the LMS.
SCHEDULE
For the most up-to-date information, please check your LEO unit and also note advice from your lecturing and tutoring staff for changes to this schedule.
Complete all activities in Module 1 (The Good Life and the Golden Rule) and Module 2 (I am because we are; individual and society) prior to your first face-to-face lesson.
Lesson 1: June 17
Introduction to the Unit / Icebreaker
1.1 Introduction to UNCC100
1.2 Ice breaker
The Good Life and the Golden Rule 2. The Golden Rule – buzz groups activity 3 -I am because we are-; individual and society
Complete all activities in Module 3 (The History and Principles of Catholic Social Thought) prior to lesson 2.
Lesson 2: June 21
4 The history and principles of Catholic Social thought (Part 1)
5 .The history and principles of Catholic Social thought (Part 2)
How does CST relate to your profession? (Scenarios)
Complete all activities in Module 4 (Human Flourishing and the Common Good) & Module 5 (The Common Good) prior to lesson 3.
Lesson 3: June 24
Human Flourishing and the Common Good
6. Human Flourishing and Reciprocity – group activity
The Common Good
7. Understanding the common good and inequality
Case study. Challenges to the common good – freedoms and the common good
8. Case study: Challenging the common good (-The Mega Worship Centre”)
Complete all activities in Module 6 (Advocacy – personal and professional challenges of Catholic social teaching) prior to your final lesson.
Lesson 4: June 28
Advocacy – personal and professional challenges of Catholic social teaching
9. Advocacy: personal & professional challenges of CST/“What’s behind my clothing?” (activity)
10. Unit -Wrap up-
NB:
Assessment 1 due July 2 5pm;
Assessment 2 due: July 23, 5pm.
ASSESSMENT
In order to pass this unit, you are required to achieve a final grade of 50% or better as an aggregate score of all points from assessment tasks completed in this unit.
The assessment tasks for this unit are designed for you to demonstrate your achievement of each learning outcome
Assessment tasks
Due date Weighting (%) Learning outcome/s assessed Graduate Attributes assessed
Feature Article July 2
5pm 50% 1 GA1, GA7, GA8, GA9
Op Ed piece July 23 5pm 50% 2 GA2, GA4, GA7,
ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION, MARKING AND RETURN
Assessments will be submitted and returned electronically through LEO
Word limits
Students may exceed the word limit on assessments by 10% without penalty. However, the marking penalty for exceeding the word limit by more than 10% will be calculated in this way: 5% of the total available marks for the assessment will be deducted from the student’s mark for each further 10% by which the number of words in the student’s assessment exceeds the limit” (Please see the assessment overview and instructions on LEO also).
Assignment 1
(Feature article)
Choose 3-5 principles of Catholic Social Thought (CST),
1) state, define and describe these coherently; and
2) explain what each reveals about the interrelationship between “self” and “community”.
What are you being assessed on?
Assessment No.1 is designed to assess the first intended learning outcome:
1. Describe coherently in writing the principles of Catholic Social Thought (CST), and through a personal written commentary, explain that the concepts of “self” and “community” are interrelated.
Readings for this assessment:
The readings from tutorials 1 and 2 of the unit available to you via LEO (i.e., The Good Life and the Golden Rule; -I am because we are-; individual and society; the history and principles of Catholic Social thought; Human Flourishing and the Common Good) and through any wider or further reading you wish to include. Please note that you are not required to read outside of the reading list in the unit in order to achieve a high distinction in this assessment task. General Instructions:
• Construct a feature article stating, defining and describing, in writing, 3-5 principles of Catholic
Social Thought (CST) as outlined in the unit; explain the inter-relationship between “self” and
“community” (with reference to 3-5 principles of Catholic Social Thought that you have chosen)
• The 3-5 should be chosen from these nine principles: Dignity of the Human Person; Common Good; Preferential Option for the Poor; Subsidiarity; Universal Purpose of Goods; Stewardship of Creation; Promotion of Peace; Participation; Global solidarity.
• From this assessment you will receive constructive feedback to assist you in completing assessment 2
• The article is to be between 1,000-1,200 words in length.
• The feature article may have illustrations/artwork that relate to the content of your article, which must be referenced correctly. Try and make your article interesting and engaging for readers.
• All material must be referenced fully and correctly (see the notes on the UNCC100 LEO page for how to reference according to your discipline area).
• References do not count in the word limit.
• This assessment will be worth 50 marks.
Due date:
Weighting:
Length and/or format: July 2, 5pm
50%
1000-1200 words
• Please see the instructions on LEO for this assessment also.
7
How to submit:
your feature article must be uploaded to LEO via Turnitin
Purpose:
Write a feature article explaining principles of Catholic Social Thought (CST), and how the concepts of 'self' and 'community' are interrelated
Learning outcomes assessed:
1. Describe coherently in writing the principles of Catholic Social Thought (CST), and through a
personal written commentary, explain how the concepts of 'self' and 'community' are interrelated
Return of assignment:
Assignments will be returned on July 16, providing feedback for preparation of assignment 2.
Assessment criteria:
A rubric outlining the criteria you will be marked on and the standard for each criterion required to
achieve each grade for Assignment 1 is attached below.
Assessment 1 Pass Fail
States 3-5 Catholic
Social Thought
Principles
(4 marks) States 3-5 Catholic
Social Thought
Principles accurately. (2-4) Fails to state 3- 5 Catholic Social Thought Principles. (0-1.9)
HD
85-100 Di
75-84 Cr
65-74 Pa 50-64 NN 0-49
Defines 3-5 Catholic
Social Thought
Principles
(6 marks) Defines 3-5 Catholic Social Thought Principles in great detail; clarifies and elaborates.
Shows deep engagement with the module materials well beyond the level of class discussion
Defines 3-5 Catholic Social Thought
Principles in detail; clarifies and elaborates.
Shows much evidence of engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion
Defines 3-5 Catholic Social Thought Principles in some detail; clarifies.
Shows evidence of engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion
Defines 3-5 Catholic Social Thought Principles in a basic way.
Response would have benefitted from more
clarification or accuracy.
Fails to define 3- 5 Catholic Social
Thought Principles (definitions of the principles are generally unclear, vague, or inaccurate).
Coherently describes 3-5 Catholic Social
Thought Principles
(8 marks) Exemplary, coherent clear and accurate description of 3-5 Catholic Social Thought Principles. Shows deep and considered engagement with module materials; may show personal insight or original thought.
Describes 3-5
Catholic Social Thought Principles very coherently clearly and accurately Shows evidence of deep engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion
Describes 3-5
Catholic Social Thought Principles coherently clearly and accurately.
Shows evidence of engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion.
Describes 3-5
Catholic Social Thought Principles coherently, and in a largely clear and accurate way. Response would have benefitted from more clarification, concrete explanation or examples, or more evidence of engagement with unit materials.
Fails to describe coherently 3- 5 Catholic Social
Thought Principles (descriptions of the principles are generally very vague, or inaccurate).
Through personal written
commentary drawing on 3-5 Catholic Social Thought
principles, explains how these help us to understand “self”
(6 marks) Provides with exemplary accuracy and clarity and coherence a personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how these help us to understand “self”
Provides a very accurate and clear personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how these help us to understand “self”
Provides an accurate and clear personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how these help us to understand “self”
Provides personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how these help us to understand “self”
Fails to explain how the chosen principles of Catholic Social Thought help us to understand “self”
Through personal written commentary drawing on 3-5 Catholic Social Thought principles, explains how these principles help us to understand “community”
(6 marks Provides with exemplary accuracy and clarity a personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how the chosen principles help us to understand
“community”
Provides a very accurate and clear personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how the chosen principles help us to understand “community”
Provides an accurate and clear personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how the chosen principles help us to understand “community”
Provides personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how the chosen principles help us to understand “community”
Fails to explain how the chosen principles of Catholic Social Thought help us to understand “community”
Through personal written
commentary drawing on 3-5 Catholic Social Thought
principles, explains what each reveals about the
interrelationship between “self” and “community
(10 marks Provides with exemplary clarity and coherence a personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how the chosen principles help us to understand the interrelationship between ‘self’ and ‘community’
Provides a very clear and coherent personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how the chosen principles help us to understand the interrelationship between ‘self’ and ‘community’
Provides a clear and coherent personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how the chosen principles help us to understand the interrelationship between ‘self’ and ‘community’
Provides largely clear and coherent personal written commentary on the chosen Catholic Social Thought principles, explaining how the chosen principles help us to understand the interrelationship between ‘self’ and ‘community’
Fails to explain how the chosen principles of Catholic Social Thought help us to understand the interrelationship between ‘self’ and ‘community’
Style and Writing Mechanics:
5 marks Presents all information clearly in a highly engaging style with no errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling. Presents
information clearly, overall, in a very engaging style with occasional or no errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling. Presents information clearly overall, in an engaging style with occasional errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling. Presents
information clearly, overall, with few errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling. Presents information unclearly Many errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling, in general.
Referencing
5 marks Exemplary citation. Provides accurate information about all sources used, to support fully the credibility and authority of the information presented.
Accurately cites all sources of information, provides accurate information about all sources used, to support the credibility and authority of the information presented.
Sources are cited accurately and student provides accurate information about the sources used, in general. Sources are cited and student provides information about sources used, in general.
No referencing or sources not cited accurately throughout.
Assessment 2
Write an Op-Ed (opinion-editorial) that allows you to demonstrate an understanding of how issues relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the common good may be addressed by you in your professional practice now and in the future.
(You need to select one issue from the list below that relates to the degree program you are studying and write a concise but persuasive opinion piece on this issue relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the common good that relates to your professional practice now and in the future.)
- the stigma attached to mental health (or other related health issues)
- violence directed towards, or threats “on the job” to, paramedics, teachers, nurses, social workers etc.
- failure to provide a “living wage” for low income Australian families
- lack of equal and equitable educational opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people
- social media and “social discord” (the role of the arts, humanities, sciences, education etc) - “doping” in sports
- unethical behaviour by the banks/ financial institutions
- treating refugees or asylum seekers like “common criminals”
- challenges faced by rural and remote communities (the role of the arts, humanities, sciences, education etc)
- “Gaslighting”
- Unfair or unethical pricing (margins)
General Instructions:
• Create an evocative and engaging Op-Ed that applies insights from Assessment 1 (knowledge base) to an issue or problem relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the common good that relates to your professional practice now and in the future (i.e., the degree program you are studying).
• The Op-Ed should clearly explain to readers what the issue or problem is (in order to achieve a pass grade or better, you must choose an issue from the list above) and how your understanding of the knowledge you have acquired in the unit addresses the issue or problem and relates to the discipline area you are studying in.
• Please note that you do not have to come up with the ‘definitive solution’ but provide a wellargued view in order to move forward on the issue.
• The Op-Ed is 700 words long.
• The idea is to express your thoughts clearly and concisely and make your argument as directly as you can – just like a journalist or writer. Do not assume that this assignment is easy given the word length. The challenge is to present a persuasive argument in a clear and concise manner.
• Although Op-Eds do not usually require referencing, for this academic work correct and full referencing is required. References do not count in the word limit. See referencing guidelines on the UNCC100 LEO page (You can find it under Assessment How do I reference course materials for UNCC units?).
• This assessment will be worth 50 marks.
• Readings for this assessment: The readings of the unit available to you via LEO and through any wider or further reading you wish to include. Please note that you are not required to read outside of the reading list in the unit in order to achieve a high distinction in this assessment task. Further, you should read the article on LEO that explains more fully what an Op-Ed piece is before commencing
this assessed task.
Due date:
Weighting:
Length and/or format: July 23, 5pm
50%
700 words
Purpose:
to write an Op-Ed (opinion-editorial) that allows the student to demonstrate an understanding of how issues relating to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the common good may be addressed by them in their professional practice now and in the future.
Learning outcomes assessed: 2 (see p.2)
How to submit:
The Op-Ed piece must be uploaded to LEO via Turnitin.
Return of assignment:
Assignments will be returned via LEO when final grades are released. If you are unsure how to find your assignment results and feedback you can read how to do this on LEO under Assessment How to find your results and feedback
Assessment criteria: The following table lists the criteria you will be marked on and the standard for each criterion required to achieve each grade for Assignment 2
.
HD
85-100 Di
75-84 Cr
65-74 P a N
N
1. On the principle of the
dignity of the human person (10 marks) Provides a clear and accurate definition and an entirely coherent account of human dignity supported by deep engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion Provides a clear and accurate definition and a very coherent account of human dignity supported by detailed engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion Provides a clear and accurate definition and a coherent account of human dignity, supported by engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion Provides a clear and accurate definition and a largely coherent account of human
dignity Fails to provide a clear and accurate definition and an
account of human
dignity
2. On the principle of the
common good
(10 marks)
Provides a clear and accurate definition and an entirely coherent account of the common good supported by deep
engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion
Provides a clear and accurate definition and a very coherent
account of the common good supported by sustained engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion
Provides a clear and accurate definition and a coherent account of the common good supported by some engagement with the module materials beyond the level of class discussion
Provides a clear and accurate definition and a largely coherent account of the common good
Fails to provide a clear and accurate definition and coherent account of the common good
3. An account of the issue, chosen from the
list in the Unit Outline; related to the degree program that the student is studying (10 marks)
Provides an entirely clear and coherent account of the issue in relation to their
degree program
Provides a clear and highly coherent account of the issue in relation to their degree program
Provides a clear and coherent account of the issue in relation to their degree program
Provides a clear and largely coherent account of the issue in relation to their degree program
Fails to provide a clear and coherent account of the issue in relation to their degree program
4. The student’s profession al practice, now and in the future, in relation to the
dignity of the human person and the realization of the
common good (10 marks)
Provides a clear and fully coherent accoun of professional practice, in response to the issue, now and in the future, that relates to the dignity of the
human person and the realization of the
common good
Provides a clear and highly coherent
t account of
professional practice, now and in the future, in
response to the issue, that relates to the dignity of the
human person and
the realization of the
common good
Provides a clear and coherent account of professional practice, now and in the future, in response to the issue, that relates to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the
common good
Provides a clear and largely coherent account of professional practice now and in the future, in response to the issue, that relates to the dignity of the
human person and
the realization of the
common good
Fails to provide a clear and coherent account of professional practice, in response to the issue, now and in the future, that
relates to the dignity of the human person and the realization of the
common good
High Distinction Distinction Credit Pass Unsatisfactory
5. Style and
Writing
Mechanics
(5 marks) Presents all information clearly and coherently in a highly engaging style with no errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling. Presents information clearly and coherently, overall, in a very engaging style with occasional or no errors in grammar,
capitalization, punctuation and spelling. Presents information clearly and
coherently, overall, in an engaging style with occasional errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling. Presents information clearly and coherently, overall, with few errors in grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling. Presents information in a largely unclear way.
Many errors in grammar,
capitalization, punctuation and spelling, in general.
6. Refere ncing
(5
marks Provides fully accurate information about all sources used. Accurately cites all sources of information, provides accurate information about all sources used Sources are cited accurately and student provides accurate information about the sources used, in general. Sources are cited and student provides information about sources used, in general. No referencing or sources not cited accurately throughout.
REFERENCING
This unit requires you to use the referencing system used by your discipline area.
See the ‘Academic referencing’ page of the Student Portal for more details.
ACU POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
It is your responsibility to read and familiarise yourself with ACU policies and regulations, including regulations on examinations; review and appeals; acceptable use of IT facilities; and conduct and responsibilities. These are in the ACU Handbook, available from the website.
A list of these and other important policies can be found at the University policies page of the Student Portal.
Assessment Policy and Procedures:
You must read the Assessment Policy and Assessment Procedures in the University Handbook: they include rules on deadlines; penalties for late submission; extensions; and special consideration. If you have any queries on Assessment Policy, please see your Lecturer in Charge. Academic integrity:
You have the responsibility to submit only work which is your own, or which properly acknowledges the thoughts, ideas, findings and/or work of others. The Academic Integrity and Misconduct Policy and the Academic Misconduct Procedures are available from the website. Please read them, and note in particular that cheating, plagiarism, collusion, recycling of assignments and misrepresentation are not acceptable.
Penalties for academic misconduct can vary in severity and can include being excluded from the course
Turnitin:
The ‘Turnitin’ application (a text-matching tool) will be used in this unit, in order to enable
• students to improve their academic writing by identifying possible areas of poor citation and referencing in their written work; and
• teaching staff to identify areas of possible plagiarism in students’ written work.
While Turnitin can help in identifying problems with plagiarism, avoiding plagiarism is more important. Information on avoiding plagiarism is available from the Academic Skills Unit.
For any assignment that has been created to allow submission through Turnitin (check the Assignment submission details for each assessment task), you should submit your draft well in advance of the due date (ideally, several days before) to ensure that you have time to work on any issues identified by Turnitin. On the assignment due date, lecturers will have access to your final submission and the Turnitin Originality Report.
Please note that electronic marking, Grademark, is used in this unit using Turnitin. Turnitin will be used as a means of submitting, marking and returning assessment tasks and so a text matching percentage will appear on your submission automatically.
FIRST PEOPLES AND EQUITY PATHWAYS DIRECTORATE FOR ABORIGINAL AND TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER STUDENTS
Every campus provides information and support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students. Indigenous Knowings are embedded in curricula for the benefit of all students at ACU.
STUDENT SUPPORT
If you are experiencing difficulties with learning, life issues or pastoral/spiritual concerns, or have a disability/medical condition which may impact on your studies, you are advised to notify your Lecturer in Charge, Course Coordinator and/or one of the services listed below as soon as possible.
For all aspects of support please visit ACU Info section in the Student Portal.
• • Academic Skills offers a variety of services, including workshops (on topics such as assignment writing, time management, reading strategies, referencing), drop-in sessions, group appointments and individual consultations. It has a 24-hour online booking system for individual or group consultations.
• • Campus Ministry offers pastoral care, spiritual leadership and opportunities for you to be involved with community projects.
• • The Career Development Service can assist you with finding employment, preparing a resume and employment application and preparing for interviews.
• • The Counselling Service is a free, voluntary, confidential and non-judgmental service open to all students and staffed by qualified social workers or registered psychologists.
• • Disability Services can assist you if you need educational adjustments because of a disability or chronic medical condition; please contact them as early as possible.
ONLINE RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS
The LEO page for this unit contains further readings/ discussion forums; you will find some helpful e- readings there also.
UNCC100 2019 Winter Term Ballarat https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/edit.php?id=30940
UNCC100 2019 Winter Term Brisbane https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/edit.php?id=30941
UNCC100 2019 Winter Term Canberra https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/edit.php?id=30942
UNCC100 2019 Winter Term Melbourne https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/edit.php?id=30943
UNCC100 2019 Winter Term North Sydney https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/edit.php?id=30944
UNCC100 2019 Winter Term
Strathfield https://leo.acu.edu.au/course/edit.php?id=30945
REPRESENTATIVE TEXTS AND REFERENCES
1. https://theconversation.com/a-refugee-like-me-why-the-golden-rule-matters-in-an-era-of-massmigration-50957 (“A Refugee Like Me: Why the Golden Rule Matters in an Era of Mass Migration”, Rivka T. Witenberg ,The Conversation, 26 Nov 2015) (4 pages online)
2. http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/index.html (United Nations, The United Nations Declaration of Human Rights) (4 pages online)
3. “Human Rights CST and the Liberal Rights tradition” (Chapter 8, A Vision of Justice, edited by Susan Crawford Sullivan and Ron Pagnucco) (21 pages)
4. http://www.humanrights.com/what-are-human-rights/brief-history/declaration-of-independence.html
(A Brief History of Human Rights, United for Human Rights) (5 pages online)
There are many other recommended readings on LEO

Looking for answers ?