Recent Question/Assignment

Assignment 3 - Theory and Practice integration essay
Select ONE of the scenarios provided on the SWTP620 LEO site. Read the scenario carefully and utilise at least 2 social work theories in order to conceptualise the key issues in the scenario. In what ways does each theory inform the social work practice response? What are some of the strengths and limitations of each theory in practice?
Your assignment needs to demonstrate a clear and detailed understanding of the purpose of social work and how theory informs social work practice.
Due date: 30 May 2018
Weighting: 50%
Length and/or format: The word limit for this assignment is 2,500 (plus or minus 10%). Words over this limit will not be considered for marking. You must include on your cover sheet what the actual word count is for your assignment. Please note your reference list is not included in the word count but in text citations are.
Purpose: To encourage understanding of a range of social work theories presented in this unit as well as the purpose of social work and the role of theories in practice.
Learning outcomes assessed: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 Page 15 of 21 Version:
How to submit: Via TURNITIN on your unit LEO site
Return of assignment: 3 weeks following the submission date.
Assessment criteria: Please refer to assignment marking criteria at the end of the unit outline.
REFERENCING
This unit requires you to use the APA referencing system.
See the ‘Academic referencing’ page of the Student Portal for more details.
ACU POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
It is your responsibility to read and familiarise yourself with ACU policies and regulations, including regulations on examinations; review and appeals; acceptable use of IT facilities; and conduct and responsibilities. These are in the ACU Handbook, available from the website.
A list of these and other important policies can be found at the University Policies page of the Student Portal.
Assessment Policy and Procedures
You must read the Assessment Policy and Assessment Procedures in the University Handbook: they include rules on deadlines; penalties for late submission; extensions; and special consideration. If you have any queries on Assessment Policy, please see your Lecturer in Charge.
Academic integrity
You have the responsibility to submit only work which is your own, or which properly acknowledges the thoughts, ideas, findings and/or work of others. The Framework for Academic Integrity and the Academic Honesty Policy are available from the website. Please read them, and note in particular that plagiarism, collusion and recycling of assignments are not acceptable. Penalties for academic dishonesty can vary in severity, and can include being excluded from the course.
Turnitin
The ‘Turnitin’ application (a text-matching tool) will be used in this unit, in order to enable:
• • students to improve their academic writing by identifying possible areas of poor citation and referencing in their written work; and
• • teaching staff to identify areas of possible plagiarism in students’ written work.
• • To submit, mark and return assessment tasks through the Grademark function in Turnitin.
While Turnitin can help in identifying problems with plagiarism, avoiding plagiarism is more important. Information on avoiding plagiarism is available from the Academic Skills Unit.
For any assignment that has been created to allow submission through Turnitin (check the Assignment submission details for each assessment task), you should submit your draft well in advance of the due date (ideally, several days before) to ensure that you have time to work on any issues identified by Turnitin. On the assignment due date, lecturers will have access to your final submission and the Turnitin Originality Report.
Please note that electronic marking, Grademark, is used in this unit using Turnitin. Turnitin will be used as a means of submitting, marking and returning assessment tasks and so a text matching percentage will appear on your submission automatically. Page 16 of 21 Version:
TEXTS AND REFERENCES:
Required text
Healy, K. (2014). Social work theories in context: creating frameworks for practice (2nd Ed.). Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan (e-book in the library)
Recommended reading
McAuliffe, D. (2014) Interprofessional ethics: Collaboration in the social, health and human services. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press
Additional references (placed on short term loan)
REPRESENTATIVE TEXTS AND REFERENCES Page 17 of 21 Version:
Allan, J., Briskman, L., Pease, B. (Eds.). (2009). Critical social work. (2nd Ed.) Crows Nest NSW: Allen & Unwin.
Beckett, C., & Maynard, A. (2013). Values and Ethics in Social Work (2nd ed.). London: Sage.
Beddoe, L., & Maidment, J. (2009). Mapping knowledge for social work practice. Melbourne: Cenage Learning.
Bennett, B., Green, S., Gilbert, S., & Bessarab, D. (Eds.). (2013). Our Voices: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Work. Palgrave Macmillan: South Yarra.
Connolly, M., Harms, L. (2012). Social Work from Theory to Practice. Cambridge: University Press.
Gray, M., Webb, S. (Eds.). (2010). Ethics and Value Perspectives in Social Work. Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
Gray, M. & S. Webb. (Eds.). (2013). Social Work Theories and Methods (2nd ed.). London: Sage.
Healy, K. (2014). Social work theories in context: creating frameworks for practice (2nd Ed.). Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan (This is available as an e-book through the library)
Ife, J. (2012) Human rights and social work (3rd ed.). Melbourne: Cambridge.
McAuliffe, D. (2014) Interprofessional ethics: Collaboration in the social, health and human services. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press
Oko, J. (2011). Understanding and Using Theory in Social Work (2nd ed). Exeter: Learning Matters.
Payne, M. (2014). Modern social work theory (4th Ed.). Basingstoke, Hampshire: Palgrave Macmillan
Pulla, V (2017). Strengths-Based Approach in Social Work: A distinct ethical advantage, International Journal of Innovation, Creativity and Change, 3(2), p 97-114
http://www.ijicc.net/images/Vol_3_iss_2_nov_2017/Pulla_2017.pdf
Additional Videos , Podsocs:
Fronek, P. (Host). (2012, December 9). Strengths-based practice: In conversation with Venkat Pulla [Episode 36]. Podsocs. Podcast retrieved from http://www.podsocs.com/podcast/strengths-based-practice
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Assignment 3
-
Theory and Practice integration essay
Marking Criteria
Marks
Critical analysis of the purpose of social work theories in practice (10 Marks)
(5) Exceptional/Outstanding
analysis of the purpose of social work theories in practice
(4) High level critical
analysis of the purpose of social work theories in practice
(3.5) Good level of critical
analysis of the purpose of social work theories in
practice
(3) Sound/Satisfactory critical
analysis of the purpose of social work theories in practice
(2) Poor critical
analysis of the purpose of social work theories in practice
(1) Failure to
analyse the purpose of social work theories in practice
Weight = 2
/5 x 2
Evidence of detailed u
nderstanding
of social work theories
(10 marks)
(5) Exceptional/outstanding
understanding of social work theories
(4) High level
understanding of social work theories
(3.5) Good level
understanding of social work theories
(3) Sound/satisfactory
understanding of social work theories
(2) Scant
understanding of social work theories
(1) No
understanding of social work theories
Weight = 2
/5 x 2
Demonstrated understanding of how social work theories inform social work practice
responses
and analysis of the practice context
(10 marks)
(5) Exceptional/Outstanding understanding of the integration of theory on social work
practice
and
analysis of the
practice context
(4) High level of understanding of the integration of theory on social work practice
and
analysis of the practice context
(3.5) Good understanding of the integration of theory on social work practice
and
analysis of the practice cont
ext
(3) Sound/Satisfactory understanding of the integration of theory on social work practice
and
analysis of the practice context
(2) Poor understanding of the integration of theory on social work practice
and
analysis
of the practice context
(1)
Fails to identify of the integration of theory on social work practice
and
analysis of the
practice context
Weight = 2
/5 x 2
Evidence of appropriate use of a range of literature which informs a well
-
articulated
and integrated
argument that address all aspects of the essay questions (10 marks)
(5) Exceptional/Outstanding coverage and use of literature. Outstanding development of
a very well
-
articulated and presented argument that addresses all aspects of the essay
questions.
(4
) High level of coverage and use of literature. High level development of a strongly
articulated and presented argument that addresses all aspects of the essay questions.
(3.5) Good coverage and use of literature. Development of a clearly articulated a
rgument
that addresses some aspects of the essay questions.
(3) Sound/Satisfactory, though largely descriptive, use of literature. Limited evidence of
the development of an argument that unevenly addresses the essay questions.
(2) Inadequate coverage an
d use of literature. Little or no evidence of the development
of an argument. Limited focus on the essay questions
(1) Very little literature cited; no evidence of an argument, lack of focus on the essay
questions.
Weight = 2
/5
x 2
Presentation, including clarity of written communication, organisation of the material,
and accuracy of APA referencing style. (10 marks)
Weight = 2
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(5) Exceptional/Outstanding paper of a publishable standard, meticulous referencing,
exceptionally creative
organisation of material
(4) High level of writing skills demonstrated, meticulous referencing, highly creative
organisation of material
(3.5) Well written and structured; accurate referencing, generally creative organisation of
material
(3) Soundly wri
tten and presented, generally well structured; adequate use of references,
satisfactory organisation of material
(2) Adequate writing but poorly organised in parts with inaccuracies in referencing,
adequate organisation of material
(1) Poorly written and
presented; little attention to structure; limited use or inaccurate
references, poor organisation of material.
/5 x 2
FINAL MARK /50

CASE STUDIES FOR ASSIGNMENT 3: THEORY & PRACTICE INTEGRATION ESSAY (2018)
Select ONE of the scenarios provided below. Read the scenario carefully and utilise at least 2 social work theories in order to conceptualise the key issues in the scenario. In what ways does each theory inform the social work practice response? What are some of the strengths and limitations of each theory in practice? Your assignment needs to demonstrate a clear and detailed understanding of the purpose of social work and how theory informs social work practice.
Due date: 30 May 2018 (at 11:59PM)
Weighting: 50%
Length and/or format: The word limit for this assignment is 2500 (plus or minus 10%). Words over this limit will not be considered for marking. You must include on your cover sheet what the actual word count is for your assignment. Please note your reference list is not included in the word count but in text citations are.
Purpose: To encourage understanding of a range of social work theories presented in this unit as well as the purpose of social work and the role of theories in practice.
Learning outcomes assessed: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
How to submit: Via TURNITIN on your unit LEO site
Return of assignment: 3 weeks following the submission date
Assessment criteria: Please refer to assignment marking criteria at the end of the unit outline (the -Rubric-)
CASE STUDY 1:
Mr Johann Schwarz
Mr Schwarz is an 82-year-old widowed man originally from Germany. He came to Australia in the 1950s to work on the Snowy Mountain Scheme in Jindabyne, NSW. He has two daughters, many friends (mostly other Germans) and he speaks English fluently with a heavy accent. Mr Schwarz lives alone in a 3-bedroom house he built himself 60 years ago. He gardens and cooks basic meals but does minimal household chores (e.g. the dishes are often in the sink and the floors and bathrooms are uncleaned). His daughters help him with the household chores when he allows them. Mr Schwarz was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease after his daughters noticed a significant decline in his short-term memory. He often ‘forgets’ that his wife passed away a few years ago, and he often cannot keep up with conversations or follow what’s on television. He does, however, remember to pay the monthly utility bills and he often talks about going to “work” (he was a carpenter).
Mr Schwarz was recently hospitalised after a fall. He did not sustain any fractures. He said he tripped when getting out of bed in the middle of the night. He was successfully treated for his wounds but his daughters expressed concern about him returning home alone without supports. Mr Schwarz was adamant he did not want any personal care services to enter his home. He feels he can manage alone. His daughters’ preference is for him to go into a nursing home.
Mr Schwarz was discharged home with personal care services. He declined their entry to the home and got quite upset saying “I said I can look after myself! There is nothing wrong with me. I am strong and healthy!”
A week later, Mr Schwarz had another fall at home and was readmitted to hospital. This time he sustained a fracture to his dominant arm. His daughters say that this is evidence he cannot cope alone. Mr Schwarz, again, wants to return home. The doctors have declared him medically fit and he is therefore ready for discharge. You know that means he cannot stay in hospital because they need the bed for someone else. You are a social work student on placement at the Canberra Hospital. Your supervisor, Emma, asks you to see Mr Schwarz.
CASE STUDY 2:
Sophie Allen
You are a social work student on placement at a private relationship counselling service. Your supervisor, Mark, asks you to see a new client, Sophie.
Sophie is a 30-year-old woman with an 18-month-old baby, Molly. She has been married to Peter for five years. They are both professionals (he is an IT consultant, and she is an Occupational Therapist). Sophie took time off work to care for their baby on a full-time basis and has not been earning an income for the past 20 months, except for receiving 8 weeks’ maternity pay from her employer.
Sophie tells you that she wants her marriage to work, but nothing she has tried has improved her situation. She tells you that she feels like a “bad wife” and she is at a loss about what to try next. She says “I don’t know what I did wrong for the marriage to get so bad”. Sophie tells you that she has tried to convince Peter to attend marital counselling with her, but he laughed loudly at her and said “No way! I thought we were smarter and more mature than that!” Sophie tells you that Peter tells her the only problem in their marriage is that Sophie is “delusional” and “crazy” and she “makes stuff up”. She tells you that he has grabbed her arms several times during arguments to prevent her from walking away from him. Each time it left bruises, but the next day, Peter apparently denies ever grabbing her saying “you know I’d never hurt you, I love you”, or says “your skin is so sensitive; you’re not normal”. She said he is not otherwise violent and downplays these events. She said Peter often “picks on” her and she can “never do anything right”. She said she feels anxious around him because sometimes a little thing can make him “explode” in anger at her. She is financially reliant on Peter as she only has a small pool of savings.
Sophie tells you that Molly has some medical issues but Peter thinks Sophie is “making it up” and “Molly doesn’t look sick, so why do you need to take her to the doctor?” and “the doctors have no idea what they are talking about”. There are a number of medical professionals involved in Molly’s care: an immunologist, a gastroenterologist, a paediatrician and the GP. Sophie lives in a small town and has to travel 3 hours to the see the specialists at a children’s hospital. Sophie presents with severe anxiety and is uncertain about what to do. Sophie tells you that she has supportive parents and a few close friends but she is embarrassed to tell them about what’s going on. You are the first person she has told.
CASE STUDY 3:
Bob Wright
Bob is a 40-year-old man who was recently released from gaol. He has never been married and has no children of his own. This is his first appointment with the employment agency as he has applied for Newstart Allowance at Centrelink last week. He calls beforehand to confirm his appointment and you happen to answer the phone. He is very charming and cooperative. You think this is a little odd because none of you other clients are so keen, but you put that feeling aside and see it as a positive. He arrives early for his appointment and is again very charming and likeable. He wants to shake your hand and that of your supervisor, Belinda (you are shadowing her today) and Bob lightly rubs your shoulder. He tells you that he is keen to work, but that his criminal record deters many employers from hiring him. He tells you that he was wrongfully accused. You don’t ask him about his crime yet as your supervisor is trying to develop trust and rapport. Your supervisor suddenly receives an urgent call and needs to leave. He asks you to continue with the session and says she’ll be back shortly.
You listen to Bob’s story. He tells you about his childhood and how his parents were cold and unloving and he was never close to them. He says he never felt like he belonged anywhere. He said that he has few friends. He lives alone in stable, but very basic accommodation. He tells you “it’s a bit of a fall from glory. I used to have so much money and could afford so much more”. He had a job in IT, which he really enjoyed, but he lost it when he was charged. There is no chance of him going back to his former employer. Bob isn’t sure what kind of work he wants to do or what he can do with a criminal record.
Finally, you ask Bob about the crime he was convicted of. He declines to tell you, saying “it shouldn’t matter, I am innocent, I just want a job!” You explain that you need to know so that you can work out what types of jobs he can (or cannot) apply for. You say “if you have a drink driving charge, you cannot work in a job where you need to drive for work, like a courier or bus driver, but if it’s for assault, you cannot work with vulnerable people”. He tells you that he was convicted of soliciting children online for sex through internet chatrooms. He is adamant that he did not do it and he was “framed” by the police. He is quite anxious now and his charm is less infectious. Your supervisor pops her head into the office and says she will not be back for the rest of the day and asks you to complete the assessment.
CASE STUDY 4:
Kylie Jackson
Kylie is a 28-year-old Ngunnawal woman from Canberra who has recently experienced sexual harassment and racism in her workplace. Kylie works as a paralegal in a small business located in a regional town in NSW three hours from Canberra. She moved to the town 2 years ago with her non-indigenous boyfriend, Sam. Shortly after moving to the town Kylie secured employment in a local legal firm. For the past 6 months Kylie has been feeling uncomfortable with a new employee, Tony, who has been sending Kylie texts during the weekend with uncomfortable and often suggestive messages. She knows that Tony lives close by (a few streets away) and she often sees him walking his dog outside her house. Kylie is reserved and scared to say anything because the last time she declined to eat lunch in the lunchroom with him things escalated. Tony started excluding her from meetings by telling her the meeting started at 10am, when in fact it started at 9:30am. He then told her in front of everyone, “I don’t care if you’re dead. You come to meetings on time. We’re not in dreamtime!”
Kylie is now on sick leave. She feels stressed and tearful and is not sure if she wants to return to work, however unemployment in the town is quite high and she and Sam are keen to purchase a home. Sam is a self-employed electrician and has had difficulty securing regular work. Sam is becoming quite annoyed at the situation and has expressed to Kylie his disappointment that she has not being able to confront Tony.
Kylie has been referred by her GP to the local Community Health Centre for counselling. You are a social work student on placement at the Centre. Your supervisor would like you to meet with Kylie and identify her needs for counselling.

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