Recent Question/Assignment

Could you please tell me about the assignment charges. And can you provide me upto my due dates.
Task description
You will be assigned a scenario from the real world where there is a certain level of evidence supporting the existence of a public health problem and a competing scenario. For example, with a high proportion of the Australian population being vitamin D deficient, would increased sun exposure be a good idea, considering the already high rates of melanoma? What evidence exists to support one strategy over another? Is the question soluble, or do we not have the evidence yet? What evidence would we need?
Over the period of the first 4 weeks of the course (or in the workshop for those attending) you will be asked to rapidly assess the evidence, and then compare and contrast the scenarios of other students. You will be then asked to discuss how an evidence base may be established to enable a discussion making process on which, if any, of the two contrasting problems is the one to give more credence to. Lastly you will be asked to distil your findings into a 3 slide presentation outlining what you have learnt, examining the problem, and discussing potential lines of study to resolve the issue.
You will be asked to submit a 1200 word report on the issue, the weight of evidence and the potential way the question could be resolved through future research or filling knowledge gaps.
To summarise, this task involves attendance at the workshop (external students), online workshop completion (non-attending external students) or weekly class (internal students), contribution to your presentation, involvement in planning and your topic report.
Planning
This first part of the task is structured a little differently depending on your mode of attendance:
1. External students who do attend the recommended workshop will receive their topics early on day 1. Through the workshop there will be opportunities to find out more about the topic, discuss similarities and differences between the topics assigned to each student. By the end of the workshop, each external student will be expected to deliver a brief presentation (3 slides/3 minutes) to the class about the key health concerns, risks and/or benefits associated with the two topics and a strategy and plan for information gathering to address the issues raised. This will be done in the fashion of a media brief by a scientific expert or a policy expert briefing a Health Minister.
2. External students who cannot attend the workshop and do the required alternative online component will need to complete the group work plan within the first three weeks of Semester by March 16. To achieve this, you will be required to participate with other students online. This will involve a discussion with other students on the similarities and differences between scenarios being worked on. The second discussion in week 3 will be around how best to generate an evidence base to answer the question on which is the best direction to pursue for public health maintenance. This group will be provided a discussion forum (see Scenario discussion space) where you will participate in identifying the key areas to be discussed and debating the similarities and differences between scenarios with other external members who could not attend the workshop.
By March 23, each external student who did not attend the workshop will be expected to upload a brief presentation (3 slides, with notes if necessary) to the class about the key health concerns, risks and/or benefits associated with the topic and a strategy and plan for information gathering to address the issues raised. This will be done in the fashion of a media brief by a scientific expert, or a policy expert briefing a Health Minister.
3. Internal students will be doing the same task in the first three weeks of class (2, 9 and 16 March). In class, you will have time to examine some provided literature on the topic to work and workshop your given scenarios with other students to examine similarities and differences between them. Frameworks and tools will be provided to facilitate your contribution.
By March 23, each group of internal students will be expected to deliver a brief presentation to the class about the key health concerns, risks and/or benefits associated with the topic and the group’s strategy and plan for information gathering to address the issues raised.
Researching and Communicating
Over the following weeks, you will examine the literature in this area and communicate with your colleagues’ online (external) and in class (internal) about each others’ progress.
Where possible, use peer-reviewed journal articles, reputable academic reports and government documents where possible - avoiding reports from industry and advocacy groups. Keep in mind, however, that industry or advocacy group reports and quality media articles (i.e. those that provide citations from research, for example the Guardian Environment or The Conversation can help point you in the direction of relevant peer-reviewed published studies.
We encourage you to share articles or highlight important aspects of the scenario that relate to other people’s topics as you explore the literature related to your own. This aspect is optional and will not be considered directly in the marking, but participation may enhance your and others’ topic reports by stimulating ideas and sharing resources.

Producing
Each group member is then required to prepare a formal report about their individual topic area and submit it through Turnitin on Week 5 (Friday, March 28).
Your report will cover the aspect of the scenario that you have researched, with a general background on your own topic area informed by the recent literature, plus a detailed analysis of your topic as it specifically relates to the scenario context. You can propose potential causal links but do not provide opinions on the merit of the activity or make recommendations. The length for Assessment 1 is 1200 words.

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